A wide range of medicines and good husbandry are the cornerstone of healthy animals

Good health is about more than fighting disease. It is also about maximizing potential by being fitter, leaner and happier. Whether it’s cattle or domestic cats, animals deserve all the products and services they need to fulfil this.

Nutrition is a key factor in good health, and the animal health sector is continually developing new, better ways to help animals get the nutrients they need.

For example, natural nutritional supplements provide essential vitamins and nutrients, which contribute to better overall health. Meanwhile, improved animal feed can also help boost antibodies that are then passed on to offspring, giving new chicks a better start in life because a healthier animal is less susceptible to disease or infection.

Beyond nutrition, immune stimulants help boost animals’ natural defense against illness, just like the probiotics or supplements that humans take. This offers an extra line of defence, keeping animals comfortable and able to thrive in their environment, and optimizing body’s performance.

And when the worst happens and an animal falls ill, veterinarians also need the most accurate and reliable diagnostic tools to be the voice of the patient. At the cutting edge, this might mean new apps or web-based programs that help identify conditions, meaning that an accurate treatment can be prescribed fast. It could also mean using portable or satellite technology to report diseases and support surveillance efforts to anticipate or predict outbreaks.

The nine largest animal health companies invest 6-9% of annual turnover each year in R&D to constantly fund innovations to help animals live happier and healthier lives.

Quick Facts

  • Nutritional supplements help reduce environmental impact: Improving overall animal health through better nutrition help farmers raise livestock more efficiently, while some supplements have been shown to reduce the level of greenhouse gas emissions from cattle.
  • Healthy animals can save money: The economic impact of diseases that can be transmitted between animals and people was estimated at more than $120 billion between 1995-2008. Keeping animals healthy reduces the impact of zoonotic disease.